Recognize Your PTA Volunteers to Keep Them Coming Back

Thank-you-word-cloudOne of the most important ways a PTA can get the most from its volunteers is to acknowledge their efforts. Perhaps your school had a volunteer recognition event back in April during National Volunteer Week. As your PTA year wraps up, be sure to thank your volunteers both publicly and privately for their work, and don’t forget to share with your administration what all those volunteer hours mean for your school. Independent Sector, a leadership network for nonprofits, estimates that the value of volunteer time for 2015 is $23.56/hour.

When recognizing volunteers, you can always go with the nice suitable-for-framing certificate, a small gift card, or a donation to the Illinois PTA Scholarship Fund. Instead of the $10 gift card or simple certificate, consider making simple volunteer recognition awards that acknowledge the hard work and importance of your volunteers in a fun way. Remember, with these sorts of awards, the presentation is as important as the award itself, so ham it up!

Awards can be easily made with simple hobby or hardware store items—a small painted plaque, a decorative item, and a little bit of hot glue are all you need. Here are some award suggestions:

  • Our Eyes Are On You: For the leader who sets the example (button eyes on a large felt U)
  • Order of the Spare Marble: For the person who’s lost them (a marble glued to a small piece of wood or to a string )
  • Spark Plug Award: For the person who is the spark of a project (a spark plug)
  • Berry Good Job: For the person who did a “Berry Good Job” (a wax or plastic berry (any kind))
  • Measure Up Award: For the person who’s performance sets the standard (a ruler)
  • Nuts About the Job Award: For the person who had to be nuts to take on the job (2 or 3 peanuts glued to a piece of wood)
  • Order of the Bear: For those that bear up under pressure (a plastic bear with a tire gauge)
  • Life Saver Award: For that person who saved you (a Lifesaver on a string)
  • Banana Award: For the person with great appeal (a wax or plastic banana)
  • Bright Idea Award: For those who had a bright idea (a light bulb)
  • Helping Hand Award: For those who was willing to help (trace a hand on construction paper mounted to a piece of cardboard)
  • Hat’s Off Award: For someone we take our hats off to (an old hat mounted on a piece of wood)
  • Right Foot Award: For those who got us off on the right foot (Trace a RIGHT foot –use caution some may not know left from right)
  • Big Heart Award: For those who always seem to have one (heart shaped craft material of any kind, then decorated)
  • “Egg”cellent job/idea /etc. Award: For those who did an excellent job (fake egg)
  • Heartfelt Thanks Award: Self-explanatory (large heart cut from felt with “Thanks” on it)
  • Thanks a Million Award: For the person you’d pay a million dollars for to have them volunteering in your PTA (a million dollars in play money or a million-dollar bill)
  • “Shell” of a Job Award: For the person who did a great job (seashell)
  • Hung in There Award: For the person who stuck through a tough job (anything hanging from something (try to get a picture of the person))
  • Worked Like a Dog Award: For the person who did just that (dog biscuit or bone)
  • Tee-rific Award: For the person who did a terrific job (a golf tee or tea bag)
  • The Coveted Dime-and-Pin Award: For those you would give a diamond pin to if the PTA budget could afford it (glue a pin to a dime)
  • Rose to the Occasion Award: For the person who really stepped up (an artificial or ribbon rose)
  • It’s “Bean” Wonderful Award: For the person leaving your PTA (a lima or other large bean)
  • Knocked Yourself Out Award: For the person who gave their all (a small hammer, mini baseball bat, or mini boxing glove)
  • Shining Example Award: For those who best exemplify your PTA (a small flashlight)
  • Hornblower Award: For those who never blow their own horn (a plastic bicycle horn or party horn)
  • Megaphone Award: For those who are soft spoken but get the job done or who never shout
  • The Band-Aid Award: For those who can fix anything
  • The Rock Award: For those who are the rock of the group
  • The Rope Award: For those who always tie up the loose ends (a piece of manila/sisal/hemp rope with the ends whipped)
  • The Crutch Award: For those you can lean on
  • Key to Success Award: For those who were key to making it happen
  • Whale Award: For those who did a whale of job
  • Football Award: For the person who always is willing to tackle a job (a small football or football player)
  • Cone Award: For the person who can lick any job (an ice cream cone)

Graphic ©2015 by Ashashyou under Creative Commons license via Wikimedia Commons.

News from the Illinois PTA Convention—Membership Recruitment, Retention, and Engagement

conv logo 2Illinois PTA understands there are challenges to PTAs in recruiting and retaining members. We believe we can best address these challenges by communicating with you, the local unit members, in finding out what works for your PTA and what doesn’t. Through online conference events and convention networking workshops, we have discovered some of the challenges you face and have brainstormed together some suggested ideas for meeting those challenges. Most recently at our 114th Annual Convention, we offered a “Recruitment, Retention, Engagement–Membership Networking Workshop.” Challenges and solution ideas expressed in a past web conference were presented and added to by the participants in the workshop.

Why Join PTA?

Why do people join PTA? What does PTA offer them? PTA offers families the opportunity to get involved in their child’s education, to volunteer to make the educational experience for the kids in their community the best it can be. Studies show that family involvement is one of the most valuable assets to a child’s success in school. Along with family involvement, PTA encourages local units to reach out and partner with their communities (businesses, city councils, service clubs, chambers of commerce, etc.) to be involved in supporting their efforts on behalf of children, families, and schools. Many people take advantage of PTA leadership development opportunities and assistance with resources for advocacy on behalf of children at the local, state, and federal levels.

Why Don’t People Join PTA?

At the workshop, participants were asked to share their experiences on why people don’t join PTA? Here are the challenges that were discussed:

  • Fear of being asked to volunteer for anything or everything
  • Parents volunteer at school but don’t feel the need to join PTA
  • Too many PTA meetings to attend
  • Cultural differences
  • Busy with other volunteer activities (e.g., sports, Scouts, dance, place of worship, etc.)
  • English as second language–can’t understand and participate in meetings or activities
  • Parents working full time can’t volunteer during the school day
  • Lack of awareness of PTA or what we do
  • Unable to pay dues
  • Uncomfortable with interaction with administration of school

The workshop participants then brainstormed ideas to deal with each challenge.

Fear of Being Asked to Volunteer or Parents Volunteer but Don’t Join PTA

  • Be sure to inform parents that while we welcome those who are able to volunteer, membership in PTA helps support your unit financially and more members provides PTA a larger voice in local, state, and national advocacy with governments and other policy makers.
  • Offer a program where you ask for a commitment of only a few hours each year from each member (e.g., PTA’s Three for Me Program). That way members are assured they won’t have to work at every event.
  • Offer a contest and reward parents for volunteering the most hours. Keep track of each volunteer’s hours either monthly or yearly. Hold a volunteer appreciation event and either just acknowledge the hours volunteered by each member or give out little awards. Many businesses are happy to donate items that can be used for this purpose.
  • What about and incentive like “reserved parking!” One school started a program where each year they place the name of every member who joins into a drawing. At a PTA meeting before a special school event, a name is drawn and the lucky winner gets preferred parking reserved at the school for that event. It was very successful in recruiting new and keeping returning members. What about doing this with a few reserved seats at the event? This would promote partnership with the school leadership. What about requiring that the winner be present at the PTA meeting to be awarded the incentive? Would that perhaps increase attendance at meetings?

Too Many PTA Meetings to Attend

  • PTAs do not have to have a meeting every month throughout the year. Your local PTA bylaws dictate how many meetings you have to hold each year. Amend your bylaws to reduce the number of meetings your general membership has to hold each year. General membership meetings are only needed to approve the audit report, to adopt or amend the budget, to elect a nominating committee, or to elect new officers.
  • Pick months for your meetings when you can involve the children in a short program or performance. Everyone enjoys coming out to see the kids perform. Ask for help from your choral or band departments on ideas for programs. Use one meeting to highlight students’ artwork. If your school participates in the PTA Reflections Program, hold a meeting to recognize the students’ achievements.
  • Pick months where you can supply a light meal or snacks. Many participants in the workshop voiced that members really enjoy coming to meetings where there is some sort of treat!

Cultural Differences

  • Find ways to reach out to parents of different cultures and help them feel welcome. Educate them that parents are able to participate in school activities.
  • Host workshops to help educate these parents and families about participating in PTA and school activities. Consider holding these workshops at different times of the week and day to allow more people to fit them into their schedule.
  • Hold an event highlighting the different cultures in your school. One PTA suggested that having an event where children from each of the cultures represented in their school did a presentation demonstrating aspects of their culture. Some used dance and song, others used language activities, and others used a sampling of their culture’s food. It is a huge success and is done every year now. What a great idea!

Busy with Other Volunteer Activities or Parents Working Full Time Can’t Volunteer During School Day

A great way to include parents and families who cannot volunteer during the school day is to provide opportunities for them to assist with things for which they do not have to be present:

  • Make a treat for a party or special event and let their child bring it in that day
  • Simply ask those parents who cannot be present to send in the paper goods. Again, allow the child to bring the items the day of the party. (Allowing the kiddos to bring the items in allows them a sense that their parents are contributing and supporting them as much as those parents who are able to be physically present.)
  • Send home craft work needed for PTA events and allow parents to cut, fold, staple, color, sort, etc., during any free time they have outside of work or other activities. Be sure to do this well in advance of the event to allow parents time to finish without feeling stressed.

English as a Second Language

  • Consider holding two separate meetings: one for English speaking members and a separate meeting for individuals who may need more time understanding the meeting discussion.
  • Have the agenda translated into their language.
  • If possible, have someone who speaks the language of those in attendance to assist.

Lack of Awareness of PTA or What We Do

  • Toot your own horn! Be sure to have information available about all the good things you do for kids. Don’t just think in terms of fundraising; talk about all the events you hold for families and children as well as the hours your members volunteer to assist at school.
  • Create a PowerPoint presentation or video showing what your PTA does throughout the year. Show the presentation or video at kindergarten or back-to-school orientation.
  • Be sure to host and advertise parent education on topics of interest to your community.
  • Inform members about the advocacy successes of Illinois and National PTA.
  • Take advantage of Illinois PTA and National PTA training. Many interesting webinars are available online. Training courses are for all members, not just PTA officers.
  • If your school has a mail-in registration, ask if your PTA can include information about what your PTA does and membership in your PTA with the mailing.
  • Check out the PTA Back-to-School Kit at www.ptakit.org. The section on Membership contains a wealth of resources for promoting PTA.

Unable to Pay Dues

  • This is a difficult challenge for PTAs. One suggestion is to find community partners who might be able to contribute funds to sponsor families to become members of PTA who may need assistance with dues.
  • Title I funds can be used to pay PTA dues for those families receiving free or reduced lunches.

Uncomfortable with Interaction with Administrators of School

  • Get parents to interact at school by inviting parents to participate in parent-led enrichment activities during the school day. Parents volunteer one hour per week to come in and teach an enrichment course about an area of their interest/expertise. These could also be implemented as an after-school club.
  • Host “breakfasts,” “coffees,” or “sack lunches” for informal times that parents can meet with administrators and express concerns or ask questions.
  • Invite an administrator to attend your PTA meetings to talk informally about things going on at your school. This may help alleviate any discomfort as members get to know the administrators.

General Ideas for Engaging Families–Including Some Programs Ready to Go!

  • “Donuts for Dads” and “Muffins for Moms”: Host quick morning events for parents as they drop off children for school.
  • “Curbside Bagel Hello”: One participant indicated that the process for dropping children off at school was such that parents could not park and come into the building for a quick morning event. The suggestion was a “curbside bagel hello.” Literally stand out by where parents drop off children and hand them a bagel and a “Hello” from PTA. This is true thinking outside the box!
  • A family movie night is a very popular event to engage families. This involves some expense by the PTA to purchase the license to show a movie, but then you can engage the community by finding partners to donate pizza, ice cream, popcorn, drinks, etc.
  • Find successful programs ready to use on the Illinois PTA website under Programs then Programs to Go.
  • National PTA has programs with everything you need to promote and administer a family event for a PTA Back to Sports Night Program or a Family Reading Experience.

If you have ideas on any of the items listed or if you have challenges and solutions you would like to share, please send them to the Illinois PTA Membership Marketing Director, Rhonda Jenkins, at rjenkins@illinoispta.org. We will share these ideas in future One Voice Illinois posts, on Facebook, and on the Illinois PTA Membership Page.

Effective PTA Communications

Multi-Ethnic group of children outdoors, arms raisedWe live in a media-rich environment with smartphones and the internet providing information in an almost constant stream. PTAs used to be able to send home a newsletter with a brightly-colored front page and know that families would see it, but the “Backpack Express” is much less effective these days. So how can your PTA’s communication be heard in this constant clamor for attention? How can your PTA communicate effectively with your school community?

Building a PTA Community

When you think about your PTA community, who do you see? Is it just your members? Is it all the families in the school? Does your PTA community include teachers and administrators? What about those in the neighborhood around your school? What about grandparents who live in another state? An important part of effective PTA communications is building your PTA community. That means reaching out and engaging everyone in that community.

Fortunately, there are a number of resources available to PTAs to help engage your community. While newsletters may still be a part of your PTA communication plan, e-mail lists, websites, and social media provide additional tools to connect your PTA with those who care about the students at your school regardless of where they live.

Your PTA’s Communication Plan

There are a variety of reasons that PTAs need to communicate:

  • To inform members about upcoming events
  • To solicit volunteers
  • To advocate
  • To share their PTA’s successful events and programs
  • To thank those who have helped out

All of these reasons have one common thread—to tell your PTA’s story. If you approach your PTA communications with this goal in mind, you are providing vibrant descriptions of how your audience can engage with your PTA and how your PTA is making a difference in your school and in your community. Your PTA communications become one of the most effective tools in bringing new members into your PTA.

To effectively tell your PTA’s story, you need a communications plan. A communications plan should include:

  • All of the communication channels your PTA will be using (print, website, e-mail, social media, VolunteerSpot, etc.)
  • Your PTA’s communication goals
  • Your target audience(s)
  • The frequency of communication on each channel
  • The deadlines for submissions for each communication
  • A list of who will be submitting content
  • A budget for your communication tools (printing costs, domain registration, etc.)
  • An evaluation plan to improve your communications over time

Georgia PTA has a useful video presentation on building your communications plan that can walk you through the process of creating a communication plan and the basics of implementing some communication channels. North Carolina PTA also has a video on creating and executing a PTA communications plan.

As you develop your plan, remember that a diverse school community needs a diverse array of communications to reach out to everyone. Consider how to connect with families of English language learners or those without internet access (or only through their phone). Think about how you can make those families unable to attend PTA programs and events at the school still feel connected to the PTA.

Your communications plan should also incorporate the rules and policies that your school or district may require. Be aware of photo restrictions, sharing children’s names, and other policies that might affect your PTA communications.

Social Media

Many PTAs have given up on printed newsletters and PTA websites in favor of e-mail lists and social media. A Facebook organization page allows a PTA to share things that would have gone in a newsletter or on a website. Twitter allows a PTA to share timely, relevant information with its followers, link to Facebook or website posts, use hashtags for events, and share important reminders or quick photos at events. These and other social media tools provide a powerful way to get your PTA story out and to connect with a broad audience.

But as Spiderman taught us, with great power comes great responsibility. Be sure to have a social media policy in place specifying who has access to and responsibility for your PTA’s social media presence. Make sure that more than one person has the login information to your social media accounts. Ensure that those who will be posting to Facebook, tweeting, or using other social media are aware of any restrictions on sharing photos that your school district has. National PTA has a sample social media policy that you can use as a template for your PTA.

Blowing Your PTA’s Horn

Your PTA’s communication should not be restricted to just your school community. Be sure to share your PTA story to your community as a whole. Send out press releases announcing your upcoming PTA events. Many school districts have a public relations or communications person whose job is to submit press releases to the local media, and they may be willing to submit releases on your PTA’s behalf or can provide a list of media contacts. While you may not end up with a news story on your event, you may have a newspaper photographer stop by to take some pictures or have a TV station record some footage that will run under their closing credits.

By communicating with your broader community, you have the opportunity to make the public aware of the great things your PTA is doing to improve the lives of children. Remember, if your PTA isn’t telling its story and sharing its good news, no one else will either. And with increased awareness of the positive effect your PTA is having comes the opportunity to partner with businesses and other organizations in your community, whether through grants, co-promotion and cooperation on events, and the ability to spread your message to a wider audience through speaking opportunities, guest blog posts, and articles in non-PTA newsletters.

Communication Tools for Your PTA

A primary communication tool should be the Communications Quick Reference Guide, a part of the online PTA Back-to-School Kit. Here you will find information on PTA branding, newsletters, websites, social media, marketing and media relations, photography and videography, and much more. Be sure to also look for the Illinois PTA piece on the Role of a Membership Marketing Chairman, which includes a sample press release and social media guidelines.

For PTA e-mail communications, a simple free e-mail list from Google, Yahoo, or other provider might be all your PTA needs. However, Benchmark provides free e-mail marketing for PTAs, allowing you to send e-mails to 100,000 contacts up to seven times a month for free. In addition, your PTA would have access to all of the advanced functions, including segmented e-mail lists, real-time reports on who opened your e-mail or clicked on a link in it, surveys and polls, sign-up forms, and more. Illinois PTA currently uses Benchmark for its Weekend Update e-mail.

For signing up volunteers, Illinois PTA has partnered with VolunteerSpot to provide local PTAs, councils, districts, and regions with a free premium package upgrade (up to $300 in value). The premium package provides unlimited custom group pages and up to 15 assistant organizers (so one person doesn’t have to run sign-ups for every event), up to five custom registration fields (e.g., t-shirt size), and more. You also get the standard reminder and thank you e-mails to those who sign up as well. To take advantage of this member benefit, follow the directions on our member benefits page.

Why PTA? Advocacy!

6280517815_e5d397bfd5_bIt is a question that is often heard—why be a PTA? Why not be an independent parent organization rather than paying PTA dues? For many PTAs, the answer is because of the many PTA programs like Reflections, the online training courses and other leadership resources, or even the member benefits. But the one thing that really separates PTA from other parent organizations is probably one that you don’t hear mentioned all that often—advocacy.

Why does PTA advocacy make a difference? Here’s one recent example. Last year, the IRS proposed a rule that would have hurt donations and memberships not just for PTAs, but for all non-profit groups across the country. The rule would have required all PTAs and other non-profits to collect Social Security numbers and other tax-identification numbers from donors.

Illinois PTA became aware of this issue shortly after it was proposed, and brought the matter to National PTA’s attention. Illinois PTA, National PTA, other state PTAs, and many other non-profit organizations provided testimony on how the proposed rule would make charitable organizations targets for identity theft, require a tremendous amount of additional paperwork, and reduced donors’ willingness to make contributions. Last month, after a flood of 38,000 mostly negative comments, including those of Illinois PTA and National PTA, the IRS withdrew the rule.

Chances are, this proposed rule and its subsequent withdrawal wasn’t front page news in your local paper and didn’t make the evening news broadcast. How many independent parent organizations even heard about this rule, much less spoke up against it? Without PTA advocacy and the ability to speak for millions of PTA members across the country, this rule likely would have become law.

Illinois PTA and National PTA advocate for the needs of children, families, members, and volunteers on many issues. Here in Illinois, we serve as the voice of families and children on many state committees, ensuring that their needs and concerns are heard. This proposed rule is just one recent example of how your PTA membership lends strength to our voice, a hidden benefit provided by your PTA dues.

If you would like to lend your individual voice to PTA advocacy efforts, be sure to sign up for the Illinois PTA Legislative Advocacy Network (under the “Quick Sign Up” bar) to get Illinois PTA action alerts.

Photo © 2012 by 401kcalculator.org under Creative Commons license.