Every Student Counts—A New Report on Public Education in Illinois

The state of Illinois has a goal of 60% of Illinoisans with a post-secondary degree or credential by the year 2025. Today, thatnumber is 50%. Advance Illinois just released a new report, Every Student Counts—The State We’re In, that documents where public education stands in Illinois on several key measures related to that goal.

every-student-counts-report-coverThe report looks at important steps along a child’s education path, including:

  • Kindergarten Readiness (currently no data)
  • 4th Grade Reading (currently 35%)
  • 8th Grade Math (currently 32%)
  • College Readiness (currently 38%)
  • Post-Secondary Enrollment (currently 64%)
  • Post-Secondary Completion (currently 28%)
  • Adults with Post-Secondary Degrees/Credentials (currently 50%)

Each of these steps is an indicator of how prepared a student is for the next step up the education ladder. For example, 8th grade math scores correlate with ACT scores, a measure of college readiness, so a student with meeting the 8th grade math standards is on track to do well on the ACT and be ready to go to college or get a post-secondary certification after graduating high school.

The report also documents the poor job Illinois has done as a state in funding education overall as well as the inequitable distribution of the funds the state does provide. This is especially significant because, as the report notes, students from wealthier families do much better on every step listed above than their peers from low-income families.

In 2015, 43% of Illinois school districts had over half of their students living in low-income homes, up from 13% in 2005. Research shows that educating low-income students costs more because they often start school academically behind their more wealthy peers. Yet, as the report notes, Illinois is last in the nation by far in providing funding for low-income students. Ohio, which ranks firsts, spends $1.22 on a low-income student for every $1.00 spent on a non-low-income student. For Illinois, that figure is $0.81 spent on a low-income student for every $1.00 spent on a non-low-income student. This means that poorer students are too often faced with larger class sizes, older textbooks, less access to classes like art and music, and higher student activity fees—all the opposite of what they actually need.

High-quality preschool education can help low-income students come to kindergarten on track for long-term academic success. As recently as 2007, Illinois was a national leader in early childhood education with its Preschool for All initiative. The recession and state budget issues now mean that Illinois now has only 75% of the students in pre-K programs that it had five years ago, with many areas of the state needing to double their pre-K seats to meet the needs of families.

You can check out Advance Illinois’s website summarizing the report and download the full report. The Illinois General Assembly’s fall veto session ends today, and the stopgap spending measure expires before the new session convenes. Contact your legislator today to advocate for a comprehensive, fully-funded budget, and if a budget is not passed, plan now to contact them again when the General Assembly meets in the spring.