10 Great Ways to Get More PTA Volunteers

8975602227_090ce649a2_oPTA is the largest volunteer organization in the world focused on the welfare of children. From the person sitting at a registration table at open house on up to the National PTA president, almost all of the work done by PTA is done by volunteers. Here are XX ways your PTA can get more volunteers.

  1. Target new families to your school.
    New families want to know what is going on at school, so having your PTA reach out to those families can be an important first step towards getting them to volunteer. Consider creating a PTA Welcome Packet for new families.
  1. Toot your PTA’s horn.
    Families aren’t going to know what your PTA is doing if you are not showing them and telling them. Be sure to post invitations to upcoming events on your PTA’s website, Facebook page, Twitter feed, e-mail list, and in your newsletter. Follow up with pictures and thanks to your volunteers after the event through all of those media. Develop a communications plan for your PTA.
  1. Find the hidden talents in your school.
    The Cub Scout program is another volunteer-led organization that has used a Family Talent Survey to identify the interests and skills that families might be able to share as part of the program. Think about the skills, talents, and interests that parallel what your PTA does to create a family talent survey for your PTA. Use it to find the artist who might be interested in helping with your PTA Reflections program or the designer who might be willing to help create eye-catching flyers and posters.
  1. Ask for feedback after an event.
    Your PTA may have those involved in planning an event review how it went afterwards and consider how it might be improved. Don’t limit your feedback to just your organizers. Survey families at an event to find out what they liked, what they didn’t like, and what they would change as well. Be sure to include “I would like to help plan this event next year” and “I would like to volunteer at this event next year” options along with contact information at the bottom.
  1. Keep volunteer shifts short.
    Everybody at a PTA event wants to spend time enjoying it with their family. By keeping your volunteer shifts short, more people are likely to volunteer because they know they won’t be missing much time with their family. Take advantage of the Illinois PTA member benefit that provides your PTA with a free premium upgrade with Volunteer Spot.
  1. Use a procedure book to make volunteering less intimidating.
    A procedure book preserves your PTA’s knowledge about how to run an event or fulfill the duties of a board or officer position. It is also a great volunteer recruiting tool. A well-designed procedure book that includes detailed information on what has been done to plan an event in the past is like a guidebook to a foreign land, providing information on things you shouldn’t miss and potential stumbling blocks.
  1. Be sure to support your volunteers.
    Don’t just hand a volunteer a job description or a procedure book and send them on their way. Be sure to check in to see if they have any questions or issues. Show them that you value the time they are giving the PTA by giving them some of your time and attention.
  1. Talk to those that aren’t volunteering.
    There are many reasons why someone may not be volunteering for your PTA. Many of those reasons may be based on myths about volunteering for your PTA. By talking with those who aren’t volunteering, you can dispel some of those myths and get new volunteers.
  1. Add diversity to your PTA.
    Look at who your PTA leaders and members are. Do they represent the diversity of your school, not just by race, but also by age, gender, language, socioeconomic status, or other measures? If not, you have a pool of potential PTA members and volunteers that you are currently not reaching. Use National PTA’s Diversity and Inclusion Toolkit to reach out to those communities and broaden your PTA.
  1. Thank your volunteers often and publicly.
    Most people aren’t volunteering with the PTA just for personal recognition, but publicly thanking and recognizing your volunteers makes them feel valued and more likely to volunteer again.

 

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